Scarborough & District Civic Society 

Historic England have announced that Bramcote Pavilion is Listed Grade II

Extracts from Historic England announcement:

The development of lawn tennis, the modern form of tennis, in the mid-late C19, saw large numbers of people taking up the sport across the country, an unusual aspect being that it was a game practiced by both sexes. The Bramcote Tennis Pavilion was built in 1885, just 10 years after the sport was introduced to the All England Club in Wimbledon. It is older than any other currently listed lawn tennis building, and given its early date for the sport must be one of the oldest surviving lawn tennis buildings in the world. The historical special interest of the pavilion is further confirmed by the fact that it was designed to include changing rooms for both sexes, marking a particularly significant social historical aspect of the sport.

Architecturally the building is also of special interest for its complex design, its intricate roof and its half-timbered, principal elevation, producing a charming building of considerable visual appeal. Indeed the building would be of special interest worthy of listing for its Arts and Crafts styling alone, being a particularly good example of the bungalow-with-veranda form of sports building which epitomised the late-Victorian and Edwardian period. Together with its clear historical special interest, the former Bramcote Tennis Pavilion unquestionably fulfils the criteria for listing in Grade II.

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION DECISION

The former Bramcote Tennis Pavilion, a sports pavilion built 1885, is recommended for listing at Grade II for the following principal reasons:

Architectural interest:

* for its complex design, intricate roof and half-timbered principal elevation, producing a charming Arts and

Crafts influenced building of considerable visual appeal;

* as a particularly good example of the bungalow-with-veranda form of sports building which epitomised the late Victorian and Edwardian period.

Historic interest:

* as a very early and rare surviving purpose-built lawn tennis pavilion dating to the earliest days of the

modern sport, and therefore one of the earliest surviving lawn tennis buildings in the world;

* including changing rooms for both sexes, the building illustrates a particularly significant social historical aspect of the sport.



Final report on the Photo  Competition


Final






Civic Day: What a day

As planned we unveiled our tribute to Oliver Sarony. All over the country similar events were held to celebrate our heritage and to remind people that this is the 50th anniversary of the first conservation areas being declared. So it’s was appropriate that we should be honouring one of Scarborough’s notable people in our Scarborough Conservation area. Lot’s of people came to see the Mayor do the honours and the board looks stunning. We even had a Sarony family member from Hong Kong! Pictures about the event in next weeks Scarborough News, so will be posted on this site asap.

A few of the attendees
picture by Mark Vesey






The Scarborough News story about Sarony March 2017

The Scarborough News story about the Bathing Belle February 2017


Society receives a regional award from YHACS for the 2016 programme of activies.